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$2275 Raised
$2175

Fundraiser Donors

  1. Kitven Lee
    $200
  2. paris
    $200
  3. Cyrill Werlen
    $120
  4. Anonymous
    $120
  5. Meg Hatch
    $120
  6. Anonymous
    $120
  7. Deva Delanoe
    $100
  8. Diane Clough
    $100
  9. Gordon Usipiuk
    $100
  10. Melissa, Emma, Elysia Allen
    $100
  11. Joyce Adams
    $75
  12. Rebecca Martone
    $60
  13. Sophie Kessler
    $60
  14. Diana Bainbridge
    $60
  15. Luci June Thorndale
    $60
  16. Lori Rockl
    $50
  17. Anonymous
    $50
  18. Cara Squair
    $50
  19. Arina Zots
    $50
  20. Deanna Kilt
    $50
  21. Anonymous
    $50
  22. Arina Zots
    $35
  23. Shannon Griffin
    $35
  24. Mr. Fred Hinsch
    $35
  25. Tigera 'Ti' Caignou
    $35
  26. Ms. Catherine 'Cath' Sanden
    $35
  27. Anonymous
    $30
  28. Nicole MacDonald
    $25
  29. Lauren Sauve
    $25
  30. Pawel Zywicki
    $20
  31. Kathleen Porpaczy
    $20
  32. Rebecca Salpeter
    $20
  33. Anonymous
    $20
  34. Ash
    $15
  35. Ms. Roberta A Staley
    $10
  36. Steph
    $10
  37. Kenneth Cameron Park
    $10

Medical Emergency Fund Page for Great Horned Owl

Found grounded and alone, this Great Horned Owl was in trouble – likely, they had been hit by a car while hunting near the highway. They’re lucky that the first person to find them was actually a Wild ARC volunteer!

The volunteer knew exactly what to do, and the owl was rushed to Wild ARC for care. Although scared and confused, the owl was still alert and feisty when they arrived. After an initial exam, our rehabilitation team found they had a broken bone in their wing and trauma to their eyes.

X-rays were performed to further assess the fracture. Thankfully, it seemed likely the owl could recover from their injuries.

The owl had their wing stabilized to help the fracture heal. They were given medication to help with the pain, and fluids to stay hydrated. At first, the owl didn’t show any interest in eating, and had to be fed manually to keep their strength up.

It wasn’t long until they finally regained their voracious appetite, and their feisty spirit was plain to see! Despite our most creative attempts, the owl managed to pull off the wrap which had to be reinforced several times. A spirited animal is a good sign to a wildlife rehabilitator – this signals a good chance they’ll be ready for a second chance to go back home to the wild.

In the wild, owls rely on their keen vision and hearing to find prey. Over half of large raptors – owls, hawks, eagles – are admitted to Wild ARC with eye trauma. Their head and eye anatomy makes them very likely to suffer eye trauma when they collide with things like cars or windows. Eye exams are performed on intake to check for any injuries or vision issues, especially if there’s a chance they’ve collided with a car, window, or something else. Veterinary Ophthalmologist Dr. Stephanie Osinchuk generously donated her time and expertise to examine the owl’s eyes with her specialized equipment.

This Great Horned Owl has come a long way, but their prognosis is still guarded. Our rehabilitation team is closely monitoring the healing process, checking their fractures and monitoring their vision. Soon, we’re hopeful that the owl can be moved to Wild ARC’s large flight pen, where they can practice flying again and regain their strength.

You can help give this owl a second chance to take flight by donating towards their care.

If the cost of care is raised for this patient, additional funds will provide care for other wild animals in need.